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Author Topic: Guide: Powering Up a PSU  (Read 64932 times)

KageDiu

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #40 on: February 13, 2002, 10:24:00 PM »

My objective is maintaining the full size power supply I am currently using.  It is powerful enough to supply both cooling systems,motherboard and components with extra left over for the possibility of peltier incorporation in the future.  I do not mind a logistically complex solution in order to conserve free space.  
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winterstick

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #41 on: February 13, 2002, 10:47:00 PM »

well then they only thing that I can really see you doing is building some sort of device inbetween the power connecter on the motherboard and the power supply...

this "device" which would prolly be made up up of a female and male atx power connector (don't need to voiding warrenties...)  The circuit would be rather simple I would think, when you give the circuit molmentary power it trips the psu causing it to turn on.  But it prevents power from going to the motherboard, then you have another circuit that counts down to a specific amount of time which telss the device to supply power to the motherboard.

Now I'm not an EE major but, you should be able to make this...
-The "circuit" could get power from the atx power cable.
-To prevent power from going to the motherboard you can use a bunch of relays, then once the timer "circuit" has counted down it can sound a constat voltage to the relays effectivly turning the computer on. (I don't know if ther are any proceudres that powersupplys/motherboards have to follow in order to not fry the board...)



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KageDiu

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #42 on: February 15, 2002, 12:31:00 AM »

I will give this a shot.
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vbcypher

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #43 on: May 28, 2002, 02:49:00 PM »

:)

I bought a new case to play with, and I couldn't convince the bastards to give me a discount for the case without the PSU, so I ended up getting a new POS 300w PSU with it.

Oh well I've been needing a 'tester' PSU.

I tried you mod and it worked beautifully...so I had to go about making this a permenent Tester PSU...

::snip::snip::snip::

By-by MR. Pentium4 connector, by-by MR. ATX Motherboard Connector, end other things.


Attached a SPST Switch to the Green and Black wires, cut the rest off at the board of the PSU with a razor and dropped a bit of non-conductive liquid rubber (for dipping tools in usually) over the little stubs on the board and away we go.

I'll post a picture of the PSU on my site later (maybe) but basically the only cables coming out the back of the PSU now are the Molex's for Power and the switch I attached to the green+black wires.  Very nice.
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lord_thanatos

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #44 on: July 08, 2002, 05:41:00 PM »

Hi there!

Got a Q about modding a ATX PSU... I tried the "wire-sollution" which works perfectly!! :)

But, initially I had 2 purposes for the second PSU:

1 - Powering fans and lights
2 - Powering my DVD player and ReWriter

The second purpose might sound stupid. :)

Anyway, when I attached a DVD player to the "mainboard-less" second PSU, it wouldn't get any power!! Only when I pulled out the flat-cable it worked!

Apparently it needs some kind of signal from the mainboard or something (which is not "on" when the first PSU is off).

Is there a sollution for this problem? If there is, could anyone mail it to
:) "lordthanatos@another.com" :)

THANKS!!

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I LOVE ED

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #45 on: July 09, 2002, 08:04:00 AM »

Another lord thanatos?  hmm.  

If your optical drive is not a slot-load, then you can open up the tray without powering it up.  If you look closely to where the volume knob would be (or if it didn't have a volume knob, look somewhere in the left portion of the drive bezel), there's a small hole there.  Use a straightened paperclip or any long piece of stiff material that would fit in that hole.  use it to push something in there.  It sometimes depends on the drive.  some drives have some gears there to be pushed to rotate or a lever to be pushed (my dvd drive has a lever)  if you pushed or moved it successfully, the tray would pop out a bit and you'll be able to pull it out easily.  When the tray slips in, it somehow moves a lever that tells the drive tray mechanism that it's closed and control the motor in the opposite direction.  pushing in that hole somehow simulates that.  hope that helps.
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BigE

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #46 on: September 06, 2002, 11:29:00 PM »

I an a complete newb to this stuff so please bare with me.  I have a very old power supply from a 486 that does not follow the specified scheme.  It has two plugs each with six wires that plug into the motherboard.  Is this what is referred to as an PSU-AT?  Anyhow, I am not clear on how to get this thing fired up.  It works when I plug it into the motherboard, otherwise, zip.  Can someone explain how to use this trick with this older PSU?

-BigE
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merlinicorpus

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #47 on: September 07, 2002, 10:53:00 AM »

Yours is an AT powersupply, which is completely different from the new ATX style.  This trick doesnt even apply to yours.  It should have a 110 wire going to the front switch that will turn it on.
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keithmann

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Powering an ATX PSU without Motherboard
« Reply #48 on: January 14, 2003, 01:29:14 AM »

you can short pin 14 (PS_ON) and 15 (ground) and the power supply will attempt to turn on, but without a load on at least the 5V line, it will immediately shut down (or burn out). Switching type power supplies such as those used in PCs will not run without a proper load.

I picked up a Power Supply Load Resistor for $15.00 US and it runs the extra fans and all my lighting.....

Keith :idiot:
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ieR

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #49 on: November 30, 2003, 09:37:51 AM »

General Gossip: can you pls describe again how does ur setting works?

i have one PSU(420w) won't be enough for my pc when my next hdd comes in, so i gotten another 420 PSU, trying to make them work together as 1, power up and down together....

but that green wire is a ground wire, dun understand how it actaully able to power up the other.

now my PSU is not with me, but when i get it back fom a friend i'll try it, so if it works... can i solder the (2ndPSU)green wire into the (1st PSU) PSU box's green wire source? i might (someway) stick those 2 PSU into 1 PSU.

thanks :) cheers cheers
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