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Author Topic: Guide: Powering Up a PSU  (Read 61110 times)

Vlurk

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #30 on: August 23, 2001, 12:43:00 AM »

Thx winterstick! I'll defenitly try your idea, too bad I don`t have any resistors right now. :( About the buzz, it is really coming from the power supply, when I connect the 5VSB (purple on my ATX connector)to a ground instead of using the regular PS-ON.

BTW, thx for your diagram Antacus, I printed it immediatly and it gave me one idea: if winterstick idea doesn't allow me to use my delta fan on my second PSU, I'll build a 17V connector using a 5V and the -12V cable. Since my delta is rated for 0,87A at 12V, I would need a 5ohm resistor right? (17V-12V=5V  5V/0,87A= 5,7.... closest resistor I should be able to get is a 5ohm) Now, do you think it would work or would it set my PSU on fire? LOL :)
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[{CRaSH}]

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #31 on: August 29, 2001, 10:12:00 PM »

i did all what i gotta do for the psu switch but it's only capable of running 2 120mm fans if i put the 3rd one they all go off

it's a 300w (generic)
and the psu fan doesn't even turn on when powered up

btw, i took the green and the ground and chopped the rest of the wires......
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mneome

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #32 on: August 30, 2001, 04:10:00 PM »

I had a generic ATX PSU that both whined and refused to put out more then 10.6v and about 2.5amps on the 12v lead, this was remidied by adding a 1amp load to the 5v lead.

btw, a 5ohm resistor will draw exactly 1amp from a 5v source, but get one rated to atleast 5watts.
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Scourge

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #33 on: September 04, 2001, 03:39:00 PM »

I did this with the old 250 watt that came with my case (i upgraded to 400).  It makes a nice little testing bed, and with my old YS Tech 120mm fan and some duct tape it could be a desk fan...
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Vlurk

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #34 on: October 02, 2001, 12:51:00 AM »

THX A LOT MNEOME! You are my hero! :) You were absolutely RIGHT!!! I only connected one molex connector to a cd-rom drive (since I didn't get any resistor yet, and I knew that a Cd-rom would hopefully draw more than 1 amp on the 5v lead) and now my cheap generic 250W PSU power up each and every fan I have in my case... I just ordered my 2nd and 3rd 120mm fans today, soon to be followed by my first neon kit and window. Long life to the king!

Btw, I know I am a little bit late, but I haven't checked this post in a while since I couldn't try winterstick idea first...
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basic

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #35 on: October 07, 2001, 10:19:00 AM »

you all seem to forget that a ps needs a draw on the 5 volt line to put out 12 volts. so you fans and stuff hooked up to the 2nd psu are only running off 10 volts, that might be the reason the delta won't run. what you need to do it but a resistor between the 5 volt line and the ground, and make sure it is a high wattage resistor, at least 25, if not 50. people using pelts off another psu have this exact same problem.
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KageDiu

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #36 on: February 12, 2002, 12:38:00 AM »

Ok, here is a ATX power supply question for anyone interested.  I have a computer that uses a combination of liquid cooling for components and vapor-phaze refrigeration to cool the CPU.  However, as I push the performance envelope further I find that I need about 30 seconds for the cooling systems to cool down before powering the motherboard up.  It would be nice to have the ability to power up the liquid and vapor systems either manually with a switch or automatically once it reaches the desired temp.  I have temp probes in place.  Any suggestions as to a safe but effective method of achieving this?  If you respond in the forum please be sure to CC my posted email address as well.  Thank you!
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winterstick

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #37 on: February 13, 2002, 01:51:00 AM »

I would say the easiesy way of doing this would be to run your cooling system stuff off one power supply, and your computer off the other.
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KageDiu

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #38 on: February 13, 2002, 12:39:00 PM »

I have also considered a seperate power supply solution.  The problem is, the even with the full tower server case I am using, the liquid cooling and phase-refrigeration cooling systems make internal space an extremely limited commodity.  So far I have managed to keep it all compact enough that I am able to work effectively inside the case while standard ventillation is still nominal.  I am really looking for a way to address these issues with the existing Enermax 530W/600W peak power supply.
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winterstick

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Guide: Powering Up a PSU
« Reply #39 on: February 13, 2002, 09:18:00 PM »

have you considered putting 2 psu's in one box?  well it would be the same size but when you look at them, there is a lot of open space in a psu...
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