GideonTech.com Forums

  • August 21, 2017, 10:40:47 PM
  • Welcome, Guest
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down

Author Topic: Project: Aluminum Water Cooling Case  (Read 41589 times)

Spotswood

  • Case Mod Weenie
  • *
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
Re: Project: Aluminum Water Cooling Case
« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2011, 07:35:08 PM »

Two cutouts were routed out of the back sheet for the bottom mounted PSU (left hand side of the pic) and intake fan, and two intake fans up top.



Eventually, some "adapter plates" will be mounted over the two cutouts.


To attach the MB tray to the back sheet, four PEM cinch nuts were pressed into the interior side of the .10-inch thick aluminum sheet.  I love these nuts because they make quick work out of adding some threads to sheet metal.





Logged
Rich

Spotswood

  • Case Mod Weenie
  • *
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
Re: Project: Aluminum Water Cooling Case
« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2011, 12:40:33 AM »

Another awesome feature of this case is the "false" back, which is simply a sheet of aluminum between the removable back panel and the motherboard tray.  The "false" back prevents the case from racking and is the primary cable management feature.  In this case, the "false" back consists of three pieces of .10-inch thick aluminum. 

The sheets that make-up the "false" back are threaded along the top via PEM nuts.  Fastening them to the top support beam is simplified via the addition of slots routed out of the support beam.  These  allow the hex wrench to be raised into position as the socket cap screws are driven into the sheet.










Along the bottom, the sheets are fastened to some 1/2-inch angle.



Logged
Rich

Spotswood

  • Case Mod Weenie
  • *
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
Re: Project: Aluminum Water Cooling Case
« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2011, 03:43:37 PM »

Top and bottom sheets cut.  Still needs to be fastened though.


Logged
Rich

Spotswood

  • Case Mod Weenie
  • *
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
Re: Project: Aluminum Water Cooling Case
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2011, 09:41:43 PM »

Slots for wire and tube routing were cut out of the top and bottom shelves.  I attempted to use a pattern router bit, but the deep cut forced the bit's bearing into the 3/8-inch thick particle board, ruining it. 



So I switched to using a pattern to guide the base of the router.



The slots along the edge of the bottom shelf were cut in such a way to allow tubing and wiring to pass without significantly weakening the 1/2 x 1-inch u-channel.




Bottom shelf slots:




Top shelf slots:







Finally, two slots were also cut out of a portion of the "false" back:

Logged
Rich

ClearCaseMan

  • Moderator
  • Elite Modder
  • *****
  • Karma: +10/-2
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3,039
    • http://www.casemodman.com
Re: Project: Aluminum Water Cooling Case
« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2011, 08:28:49 AM »

Beautiful work. I really look forward to seeing it completed. :thumbsup:
Logged


Spotswood

  • Case Mod Weenie
  • *
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
Re: Project: Aluminum Water Cooling Case
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2011, 05:20:40 PM »

The three pieces of "false" back were attached to the bottom shelf via three pieces of 1/2-inch angle and some socket cap screws.







Logged
Rich

Spotswood

  • Case Mod Weenie
  • *
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
Re: Project: Aluminum Water Cooling Case
« Reply #16 on: November 23, 2011, 04:30:58 PM »

Up until now the front of the case has been held on with masking tape, but its now time to attach it securely.  I had originally planned on drilling through holes and bolting the front to the case, but there wasn't much room for my hands to hold onto a nut, so I increased the size of the through hole a bit and pressed-in some PEM nuts.




The front frame consists of 1x1 and 1/2x1 u-channels.






Button head bolts were used to attach the front to the case.

Logged
Rich

YucA

  • Elite Modder
  • ****
  • Karma: +9/-1
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,602
Re: Project: Aluminum Water Cooling Case
« Reply #17 on: November 23, 2011, 07:25:42 PM »

whoa. This is the first I see of these PEM nuts. Pretty slick!
Logged

Spotswood

  • Case Mod Weenie
  • *
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
Re: Project: Aluminum Water Cooling Case
« Reply #18 on: November 30, 2011, 11:46:02 PM »

The side panels were cut via the help of a large makeshift square made from a small square clamped to a ruler.






The radiator ventilation cutouts were made with the help of a router template. Some bits of scrap aluminum were bolted to the underside to eliminate any errors with placing the template accurately on the sheets.




Determining where to make the cutouts was easily done via a dab of India ink on the head of a screw and some masking tape.  The panel was repeatedly pushed up against the inked bolt.







I'll round the corners later.
Logged
Rich

Spotswood

  • Case Mod Weenie
  • *
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
Re: Project: Aluminum Water Cooling Case
« Reply #19 on: December 02, 2011, 01:43:57 AM »

In order to accurately drill the bolt holes to attach the perforated aluminum to the side panels, I fabricated a drill template from some left over flat bar stock and a drill bushing I had lying around the shop.



A couple of spacers was used to quickly and accurately place the jig on the work piece (to avoid having to measure/layout the location of the holes).




Some .063 perforated aluminum cut to size:





To accurately cut the rounded corners on the side panels a router jig was fab'd from a piece of the corner round used on the body of the case, 1-inch u-channel and a couple of 1-2-3 block hot glued to some particle board.  Two strips of Mylar from an old drum head was used to smooth out any irregularities.




Tah-dah!




« Last Edit: December 02, 2011, 01:55:34 AM by Spotswood »
Logged
Rich
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.068 seconds with 20 queries.