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Author Topic: preventing a short  (Read 4915 times)

urgannagru

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preventing a short
« on: March 21, 2008, 05:31:22 PM »

i have a very tight enclosure space, and i need something thin and semi-permenant to put between a soldered board and a piece of metal it would otherwise be touching, so that it doesn't short out. what could i use?
(and where could i buy it)
« Last Edit: March 21, 2008, 05:39:13 PM by urgannagru »
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blafrisch

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Re: yellow tape
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2008, 05:38:22 PM »

Heavy duty paper or duct tape would be my choices.  Whatever you do, do not use the ubiquitous pink foam.
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urgannagru

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Re: preventing a short
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2008, 05:41:24 PM »

duct tape wouldn't short it? would card stock be thick enough paper?
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blafrisch

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Re: preventing a short
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2008, 05:47:35 PM »

Duct tape is not conductive, but the paper would be better.  Yes, card stock would work.  It won't wear through unless the part is moving a lot.
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Hak Foo

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Re: preventing a short
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2008, 07:45:14 PM »

I like mailing tape-- it's fairly resilient, and unlike black electrical tape, will actually stick to things other than electrical tape.
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MaxamusCrasious

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Re: preventing a short
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2008, 08:41:14 PM »

I've used anti static bags in the past. Years ago my friend had a brand new self built computer that would not post, so we pulled the board out, and it posted just fine. I found out that the board was shorting out onto the "built in" (pressed into the mobo tray) standoffs for the mobo. So we took the anti static bag it came in and laid it down under the motherboard and ran the screws right through. The machine is still running to this day.

In your case I would attach the bag to the metal using some tape so you don't get any adhesive on the pcb (just in case you need to send it back, obvious residue marks may kill any RMA plans)

blafrisch

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Re: preventing a short
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2008, 09:38:00 PM »

I've used anti static bags in the past. Years ago my friend had a brand new self built computer that would not post, so we pulled the board out, and it posted just fine. I found out that the board was shorting out onto the "built in" (pressed into the mobo tray) standoffs for the mobo. So we took the anti static bag it came in and laid it down under the motherboard and ran the screws right through. The machine is still running to this day.

In your case I would attach the bag to the metal using some tape so you don't get any adhesive on the pcb (just in case you need to send it back, obvious residue marks may kill any RMA plans)

Anti-static bags are conductive, same as the pink foam.  Read about Faraday cages here and reconsider trying that in the future. :)
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MaxamusCrasious

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Re: preventing a short
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2008, 11:21:13 PM »

Hmm... well then, ignore what I said :lol:

I did just take my multimeter to a anti-static bag and did not get any resistance or continuity readings though, but better to be safe.

I would go with either tape, or thin plastic sheeting (like in the bottom of a psu) in light of these new discoveries.

JoeJoe

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Re: preventing a short
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2008, 12:03:13 AM »

squirt a bunch of hot glue on the back of the solder board, it cleans easy, leaves no residue, is not conductive either.
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Skylined

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Re: preventing a short
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2008, 02:52:00 PM »

If it's small, use acrylic from an old CD/DVD box.
If you use tape, the circuit itself might punch a hole in it and you're going to end up with a nice short. :)
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