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Author Topic: Binary Clock  (Read 3030 times)

Zero Nova

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Binary Clock
« on: August 25, 2003, 11:22:08 PM »

I know they sell something like this at thinkgeek.com http://www.thinkgeek.com/cubegoodies/lights/59e0
But i dont like the way they look, thier small and they only use 6 bits instead of all 8 like true binary


I wanna have 3 rows of leds, hour,min,sec.
each row would have 8 leds, the leds would
only be on based on the time.I know not all 8
will ever be used but what the hell, why not

say the time was 9:16 and 36 secs
in binary that would look like:
00001001 --- hour
00010000 ----min
00100100 ----sec

The Leds would look like:
OFF,OFF,OFF,OFF,ON,OFF,OFF,ON --- hour
OFF,OFF,OFF,ON,OFF,OFF,OFF,OFF --- min
OFF,OFF,ON,OFF,OFF,ON,OFF,OFF --- sec

Now hears the question, does anyone know how the hell
to make this possible????
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viridius

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Binary Clock
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2003, 11:38:40 PM »

Simple, get a 555 timer and set it to oscillate in astable mode once per second.  Hook that up to a pair of 4029 counters and set the second counter to advance another pair of counters and reset itself every 60 pulses.  Set up the second pair the same as the first, resetting every 60 pulses and advancing a third pair every 60 pulses.  Set the third counters to reset itself every 24 pulses, and you're golden.
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timid1

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Binary Clock
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2003, 11:44:05 PM »

Quote from: viridius
Simple, get a 555 timer and set it to oscillate in astable mode once per second.  Hook that up to a pair of 4029 counters and set the second counter to advance another pair of counters and reset itself every 60 pulses.  Set up the second pair the same as the first, resetting every 60 pulses and advancing a third pair every 60 pulses.  Set the third counters to reset itself every 24 pulses, and you're golden.


LOL.  English please.   :idiot:

Simulate it in CircuitMaker before you do it. ;)
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Zero Nova

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Binary Clock
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2003, 11:53:31 PM »

lol ya im sayin the same thing over here
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timid1

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Binary Clock
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2003, 12:02:40 AM »

Quote from: Zero Nova
lol ya im sayin the same thing over here


I was actually trying NOT to say that it's not worth it, but it's SERIOUSLY not.... there's quite a bit involved.  I'd imagine you'd need a specific multiplexer in addition to a boat load of LED's.  Give it a couple days then bump the post to see if anyone else knows how to do it.
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stratjakt

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Binary Clock
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2003, 12:20:42 PM »

Hate to bump old threads, but..

Way back in high school I breadboarded an entire working digital clock, the teach let me do it in lieu of the normal boring coursework.. He challenged me  "Get this working, you get an A, dont and you'll be back next year".

The circuit, although fairly daunting on paper, really was not all that complex.  Start with the 555 set up to give a 60 Hz pulse, which was fed through a divide by 60 chip (or alternately 60hz straight to the clock on a pushbutton to "set it", you know the cheap digital clocks that you set by making them run fast....)

Now with the 1Hz, you basically hook up a ripple counter for seconds (ones), a divide by 10 counter for seconds (10s), and take the output of the seconds counters through an and gate with inverters to reset seconds at 60, and use this pulse to drive minutes.  Minutes are easy too, ones, divide by 10 to reset ones, drive 10s just like seconds, which drives hours..  Hours were a little funkier, since they go to 12 - but easy..   If the 10s digit for hours has a 1 in it, the ones counter only goes to two, else all the way up 0 to 9..   Toggle one more bit for AM/PM..

All those outputs go through a 7 seg decoder to the display.  Want a binary display?  Send em straight to LEDs.

Anyhow, the circuit logically is very simple.  It took me two weeks of class time to breadboard (90 minutes a day).  There's a point to this longwinded rant.

Like I said, the circuit is the simplest circuit you see in the cheapest of digital clocks.  So, it should be relatively easy to butcher a cheap clock, find the 7 seg decoders (7447s?  its been a while) and wire LEDs to the inputs of those (outputs of the decade counters)..  

It'd probably have to be a cheap and old clock to find the points - most new ones probably have the whole circuit on one piece of silicon.  Find an old clock, it'll probably run on 7400 series ICs.

Anyhow, I made this circuit as a high school sophomore.  No special components needed.  The hardest part, really, is getting an accurate 60hz out of the 555 (or whatever else you use to drive it) I'm sure you can find it on the web if you look hard enough.

Or you could wire a display up to your parallel/serial/usb port and do the binary clock thing in software..

Let old threads RIP.
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merlinicorpus

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Binary Clock
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2003, 12:54:31 AM »

Consider this thread reopened.
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Squeak

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Binary Clock
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2003, 02:45:33 AM »

can the one who locked it give a good explanation why?
it ws good info
and thanxmerlini for unlocking it
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I LOVE ED

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Binary Clock
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2003, 08:31:26 AM »

I was about to reply to this but then I noticed that it was locked, well in part because it was an old thread.  But anyway, in reply to the request to have 8 leds instead of just 6, it's because of the limitations of numerical values used in time displaying.  So the additional leds won't even be used at all.  Like for example the Hour set.  the 7th and the 8th LED won't be used at all.  the 6th LED would be added if you want to use military time (go up to 24).
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snow veil

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Binary Clock
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2003, 02:55:18 PM »

the thing that I find weird about that clock is that it works on a per-digit basis.  Instead of 10:30:15 read out as:

   
  0  0 0  0 0
  0  0 0  0 1
0 0  1 0  0 0
1 0  1 0  1 1

(literally:  1 0  3 0  1 5)

I suppose this is what you're trying to accomplish?


    0   0
0   1   0
1   1   1
0   1   1
1   1   1
0   0   1

where the first column is hours, the second column is minutes, and the third column is seconds.  This particular example also displays 10:30:15.

x24 is right in terms of using the full 8 bits, it'd be overkill because the top two (and 3 in the hour instance) would never be used.

I guess I'm just trying to clarify the layout and method for sending info to the leds.
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